Major Study Rewrites the Driving Source of Atlantic Ocean Circulation – Discover Magazine

By Roni Dengler

Massive volumes of water circulate throughout the Atlantic Ocean and serve as the central drivers of Earth’s climate. Now researchers have discovered that the heart of this circulation is not where they suspected.

“The general understanding has been [that it’s] in the Labrador Sea, which sits between the Canadian coast and the west side of Greenland,” said Susan Lozier, a physical oceanographer at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, who led the new research. “What we found instead was that … the bulk [of it] is taking place from the east side of Greenland all the way over to the Scottish shelf.”

The discovery will help improve global climate models.

Read full article: http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2019/02/01/amoc-ocean-current-driving-cause/#.XFm3Iy2ZNp_

How Climate Change Could Jam The World’s Ocean Circulation

Scientists are closely monitoring a key current in the North Atlantic to see if rising sea temperatures and increased freshwater from melting ice are altering the “ocean conveyor belt” — a vast oceanic stream that plays a major role in the global climate system.

by Nicola Jones

Article: http://e360.yale.edu/feature/will_climate_change_jam_the_global_ocean_conveyor_belt/3030/

LOZIER HONORED FOR CONTRIBUTIONS TO PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Susan Lozier, Ronie-Rochelle Garcia-Johnson Professor of Earth and Ocean Sciences at Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment and Vice-Provost for Strategic Planning, will receive a 2016 Ambassador Award from the American Geophysical Union (AGU).

Ambassador Awards are among the highest honors bestowed annually by AGU. They recognize outstanding contributions in scientific leadership, societal impact, service to the academic community, and promotion of the talent/career pool within earth and ocean sciences.

Full article: https://nicholas.duke.edu/about/news/lozier-honored-contributions-physical-oceanography

‘Go with the flow’: Research on the currents in the subpolar North Atlantic

This past July chief scientist Laura de Steur and the crew of the Pelagia set out to take measurements of the subpolar gyre as part of NACLIM and OSNAP research programs. Research conducted on this cruise, and as part of these programs, is important in understanding the “role of the ocean in our climate and future climate change.” Learn more about their work this summer, and ongoing research, in this film created over the course of the cruise.